Archive for April, 2010

Bad Food Ingredients

April 19, 2010

Artificial Colors

Why it is Used

Chemical compounds made from coal-tar derivatives to enhance color.

Why it is Bad

Linked to allergic reactions, fatigue, asthma, skin rashes, hyperactivity and headaches.

Artificial Flavorings

Why it is Used

Cheap chemical mixtures that mimic natural flavors.

Why it is Bad

Linked to allergic reactions, dermatitis, eczema, hyperactivity and asthma
Can affect enzymes, RNA and thyroid.

Artificial Sweeteners

(Acesulfame-K, Aspartame, Equal®, NutraSweet®, Saccharin, Sweet’n Low®, Sucralose, Splenda® & Sorbitol)

Why it is Used

Highly-processed, chemically-derived, zero-calorie sweeteners found in diet foods and diet products to reduce calories per serving.

Why it is Bad

Can negatively impact metabolism
Some have been linked to cancer, dizziness, hallucinations and headaches.

Benzoate Preservatives

(BHT, BHA, TBHQ)

Why it is Used

Compounds that preserve fats and prevent them from becoming rancid.

Why it is Bad

May result in hyperactivity, angiodema, asthma, rhinitis, dermatitis, tumors and urticaria
Can affect estrogen balance and levels.

Brominated Vegetable Oil

(BVO)

Why it is Used

Chemical that boosts flavor in many citric-based fruit and soft drinks.

Why it is Bad

Increases triglycerides and cholesterol
Can damage liver, testicles, thyroid, heart and kidneys.

High Fructose Corn Syrup
(HFCS)

Why it is Used

Cheap alternative to cane and beet sugar
Sustains freshness in baked goods
Blends easily in beverages to maintain sweetness.

Why it is Bad

May predispose the body to turn fructose into fat
Increases risk for Type-2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer
Isn’t easily metabolized by the liver.

MSG

(Monosodium Glutamate)

Why it is Used

Flavor enhancer in restaurant food, salad dressing, chips, frozen entrees, soups and other foods.

Why it is Bad

May stimulate appetite and cause headaches, nausea, weakness, wheezing, edema, change in heart rate, burning sensations and difficulty in breathing.

Olestra

Why it is Used

An indigestible fat substitute used primarily in foods that are fried and baked.

Why it is Bad

Inhibits absorption of some nutrients
Linked to gastrointestinal disease, diarrhea, gas, cramps, bleeding and incontinence.

Shortening, Hydrogenated and Partially Hydrogenated Oils
(Palm, Soybean and others)

Why it is Used

Industrially created fats used in more than 40,000 food products in the U.S.
Cheaper than most other oils.

Why it is Bad

Contain high levels of trans fats, which raise bad cholesterol and lower good cholesterol, contributing to risk of heart disease.

Excerpted from “GET REAL” and STOP Dieting! Copyright 2009 – Brett Blumenthal

Now I expect to get a few people say there is nothing wrong with these products. Please keep your comments to yourself. Believe the lies set before you by the government. The USDA and the FDA signed off on saying this stuff is OK when they are aware that it isn’t. And you should also know that nothing will ever be done about these bad ingredients. Most of you aren’t aware that the use of MSG was taken out of all foods and that started in the 1970’s and yet since about 2008 MSG has made a comeback and who but a corrupt government who does not give a damn about your health would allow such a thing? According to the food industry, your life depends on how cheap it is to feed you and they don’t give a damn if what they feed you is poison. But since you are just going to sit there and ignore this and do nothing then nothing is what will occur. As I said before if you don’t give a damn enough about your own health, who else is going to give a damn about you?

John Sutton

The Cooking Inn
http://www.thecookinginn.com
April 18, 2010

Stress

April 17, 2010

Stress

When was the last time you went through a period of stress? Can you remember the way your body reacted? Chances are you didn’t feel quite like yourself. Health experts say that stress can come with some pretty surprising symptoms-from forgetfulness to nausea to skin rashes. Is your body sending you an S.O.S. that you shouldn’t ignore? Read on to find out if stress is taking a toll on you-and what you can do to reverse the effects.

1. Tweaked Muscles
The pain in your neck that you attributed to long hours at the computer could actually be a symptom of stress. “Stress definitely affects our musculoskeletal system, resulting in tight, contracting muscles and/or spasms in muscles,” explains Elizabeth Lombardo, PhD, MS, PT, a psychologist and physical therapist in Wexford, Pennsylvania, and author of A Happy You: Your Ultimate Prescription for Happiness. “It gets us ready for fight-or-flight, although unlike our cavewomen ancestors, we don’t actually need our bodies to react like this.” If you’re experiencing what you believe to be stress-related muscle symptoms, try this exercise: Take 5 to 10 deep breaths and focus on relaxing the tense area of your body, says Dr. Lombardo. For the neck, try gentle neck rolls or enlist your husband to give you a quick shoulder rub.

2. Eye Twitching
Have you ever had an eye twitch? The often temporary condition can be annoying and worrisome, and for some, can be triggered by stress. “This condition is known as blepharospasm,” explains Debbie Mandel, MA, a stress and wellness expert and author of Addicted to Stress: A Woman’s 7-Step Program to Reclaim Joy and Spontaneity in Life. “Closing your eyes and visualizing your happiest place on earth will help.” Also, avoid stress-related eye issues by giving your peepers a break now and then. “If your eyes get stressed from detailed work at the computer, ‘stretch’ them every 20 minutes by looking out the window at a larger landscape,” suggests Mandel. “If you have no view, close your eyes and imagine a panorama.”

3. Ragged Cuticles
Do you have ragged, unkempt cuticles or nails? Their condition could be the result of a stress-induced nervous habit. “Nervous habits like nail-biting are how we channel our stress by distracting ourselves with what is known as oral satisfaction,” says Mandel, adding that picking nails and cuticles is also a common way for women to deal with feelings of stress and anxiety. If you take stress out on your hands, consider keeping a stress ball in your desk drawer-something you can squeeze or knead when on the phone with a difficult client, for instance. This helps “squeeze the stress out of your body,” says Mandel.

4. Cavities
We all know that slacking off on dental hygiene is the first way to get cavities, but stress can also be a culprit, say experts, especially when you’re grinding your teeth at night or during the day. Mandel explains teeth grinding, which many women do, as “chewing over the day’s stressors.” The problem, however, is that this bad habit can erode dental work, damaging your teeth and making them more susceptible to cavities. Mandel suggests redirecting your anxiety to pen and paper. “Set aside time to write down your problems to see them objectively in black and white, and then jot down some solutions,” she says. But, she adds, “If teeth grinding is severe, see a dentist about getting a mouth guard.”

5. Rashes
It sounds strange, but your skin can be a pretty good barometer of your stress level. “Stress can cause a rash, usually raised red spots or hives on the stomach, back, arms and face,” notes Dr. Lombardo. “While we don’t know why it occurs, some experts believe that it has to do with the adverse effects of stress on the immune system-histamine is released, causing these itchy bumps.” Deep breathing may keep rashes at bay, or from developing in the first place. So, next time you feel your stress level rising, place your hand right above your belly button. “Every time you inhale, you want your hand to rise; with each exhale, it lowers. Take 5 to 10 deep breaths periodically throughout the day.”

6. Nausea
Have you ever been worried about a loved one’s (or your own) health condition, Googled it and suddenly felt nauseated? “Stress can upset the stomach, and nausea can be a byproduct of worry,” says Mandel, who warns against playing “Google MD.” Worrying about your health or a loved one’s is normal, but obsessing about it is unhealthy. If your anxiety is causing nausea, try this trick that Mandel swears by: Let tepid water run over your fingers; it’s believed to keep nausea at bay.

7. Sleepiness
Feeling sluggish? It could be stress. “Stress hormones cause your body to surge with adrenaline and then crash into sleepiness,” says Mandel. “Stress will also ruin the quality of your sleep, so you wake up tired and irritable.” What to do? Go to bed earlier, says Mandel, or catch a 30-minute nap midday, and don’t feel guilty about doing so. “There is great productivity in rest,” she says. “You come back more focused!”

8. Forgetfulness
Ask any woman who is trying to do it all and she’ll admit to a few slip-ups in the memory department (forgotten appointments, lost keys, missing cell phone-ring a bell?). “Research shows that chronic stress can literally shrink the size of the hippocampus, which is responsible for some memories,” says Dr. Lombardo. “Luckily, its size will go back to normal once your stress level reduces.” Want to keep your brain functioning at an optimal level? Combat the first signs of stress with exercise, she says: “Go for a walk, run up a flight of stairs or dance around to the newest Black Eyed Peas tune.” Exercise, she adds, keeps your brain sharp and may even help you be more prepared for future stressful moments.

9. Confusion
You can’t decide what to make for dinner, what to wear to work or which exit to take off the freeway. Stress causes distraction and lack of focus, says Mandel. “Stress hormones lodge longest in the brain,” she says. To restore focus, take a walk, she says. “Move the stress out of your body by exercising large muscle groups like the legs. You will gain clarity. Walk out in the light and you’ll reset your natural rhythm while you move out the stress. Sunlight helps the body release serotonin to improve mood, and vitamin D helps you improve your immune system-a great perk.”

Info From: Women’s Day.
And Guys, you can also experience the exact same symptoms and cna be helped by the suggestions.

Do you know that Stress can Kill you?

John…

Head Recall

April 16, 2010

North Dakota Firm Recalls Whole Beef Head Products That Contain Prohibited Materials
Recall Release
FSIS-RC-023-2010

Congressional and Public Affairs
(202) 720-9113
Catherine Cochran

WASHINGTON, April 5, 2010 – North American Bison Co-Op, a New Rockford, N.D., establishment is recalling approximately 25,000 pounds of whole beef heads containing tongues that may not have had the tonsils completely removed, which is not compliant with regulations that require the removal of tonsils from cattle of all ages, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Tonsils are considered a specified risk material (SRM) and must be removed from cattle of all ages in accordance with FSIS regulations. SRMs are tissues that are known to contain the infective agent in cattle infected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), as well as materials that are closely associated with these potentially infective tissues. Therefore, FSIS prohibits SRMs from use as human food to minimize potential human exposure to the BSE agent.

The product subject to recall includes:

* Various weight cases of “Beef Heads KEEP FROZEN.” Each case bears the establishment number “EST. 18859” inside the USDA mark of inspection and a case code number “16999.” “North Dakota Natural Beef” is printed in the bottom left-hand corner of each label.

The recalled products were produced between June 25, 2009, and February 19, 2010. These products were shipped to distribution centers in Md., CO, and Minn. for further sale.

The problem was discovered during FSIS inspection activities at the establishment. FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Media with questions about the recall should contact Philip Wicke, Vice President of Operations, at (701) 356-7723. Consumers with questions about the recall should contact Jeremy Anderson, Director of Customer Service, at (952) 545-2495.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

Recycling your used coffee grinds

April 6, 2010

Recycling your used coffee grinds

The average coffee drinking American consumes about 3 cups of coffee a day?

There are many ways you can recycle and reuse your old coffee grinds to help preserve the environment and maintain your health.

* Touch up furniture and other wood scratches with grounds and a Q-tip.
* Sprinkle around areas where pesky insects, slugs and snails dwell to drive them away.
* Mix with soil as a natural fertilizer for plants.
* Dye clothing or paper.
* Rub into your dog as an organic flea dip.
* Fill old nylons and hang in your closet or fridge to repel odors.
* Use to fill old pin cushions.
* Scrub away grease and grime from pots and pans.
* Throw on ashes before cleaning out the fireplace to reduce dust from spreading.
* Feed to worms to help with your garden.
* Rub on your hands to eliminate odors.
* Mix ¼ grinds with one egg white and massage onto face like a mud pack.

If you’re not an avid coffee drinker but you live near a coffee shop or cafe, you can always ask them for the old grinds. Places like Starbucks actually give bags of used grinds away to people who use them for their home and gardens.

Recycling is just one way that we can help maintain the natural beauty of our environment, so next time you drink a cup of coffee save those coffee grinds for future use.

By Huddler’s Green Home Community